oleksiy koval

Posts Tagged ‘rhythm’

THE RHYTHM SECTION AND DE STIJL

In ESSAYS on November 24, 2017 at 10:37 am

The general in spite of the particular was how the mathematician and theosopher Dr MHJ Schoenmaekers (1875-1944) defended the concept of the group De Stijl. The necessity at the beginning of the 20th century to emphasize The general, was characterized by no longer relevant figure principles of traditional use of forms. The general is defined as a matter by the group De Stijl to develop a new form of formal language, which was based on the variation of the few basic principle of artistic creation (De Nieuwe Beelding).

After 100 years of De Stijl, in the age of the total relativism it is unconvincing to let The general triumph over The particular. Not to be confined by the greatest, yet to be contained within the smallest is a definition, which declared the enterprise of the artists group Rhythm Section. The substantive trait, which linked the artists of the group Rhythm Section in their works is the commitment to a hyper reflexivity in dealing with the rhythm, not as a compulsion, but as an original constant. The clear handling of the rhythm allows an endless variety of individual variations.

The striking link between De Stijl and Rhythm Section I see in the original handling of their understanding and construction of visual rhythm. If De Stijl laid the general foundation for the form of the rhythm in fine arts, then Rhythm Section relates this form to the smallest.

The search for the true painting is that which I absorbed from the study of Piet Mondrian and De Stijl. The core of the true painting lies not in the image but in the origin of painting. A 100 years ago a central issue of Mondrian’s painting was to accomplish the emancipation of the rhythm and this is a central issue of my painting today. For Piet Mondrian the origin of painting was lying 100 years ago in the design of the surface, similarly for me the origin, truth and purpose of painting today lies in the application of colors on surfaces. 100 years ago for Piet Mondrian the rhythm in painting was a design element of the surface, today the rhythm in painting is for me a design element of the movement.

The purest rhythm must be the purest expression of life … all expressions of rhythm are true, says Piet Mondrian.

Oleksiy Koval, Munich, May 2016

Thanks for help realizing this text to Prof. Bernhard Lypp, Veronika Wenger and Michael Wright


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OLEKSIY KOVAL | 1, 2, 1, 3, 1, 5 | GALLERY KARIN WIMMER

In EVENTS | VERANSTALTUNGEN on November 22, 2017 at 6:27 pm

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OLEKSIY KOVAL
1,2,1,3,1,5

In der Ausstellung mit dem Titel 1,2,1,3,1,5 zeigen wir aktuelle Arbeiten des Künstlers Oleksiy Koval, der sich in seiner Malerei mit dem Element des Rhythmus beschäftigt. Rhythmische Strukturen generieren den Malprozess als eine mehr oder minder geregelte Bewegung in Raum und Zeit. Sie geben dem Anbringen von Farben auf Flächen eine Form. Die Frage, was ist Rhythmus in der Malerei, hat Oleksiy Koval nie losgelassen. Während seines Studiums an der Akademie der Bildenden Künste München suchte Koval nach einer Polarität in der Malerei: „Ich wollte räumliche Darstellungen vermeiden und stattdessen eine Differenz wiedergeben, in der die Farbe auf der Fläche bleibt und dennoch eine visuelle Weite gewinnt.”

Karin Wimmer contemporary art
Amalienstrasse 14
Munich 80333
Germany
http://www.karinwimmer.com


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Oleksiy Koval 1,2,1,3,1,5
Karin Wimmer contemporary art, Munich 2017
Photo © Sophie-Charlotte Bombeck

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Oleksiy Koval 1,2,1,3,1,5
Karin Wimmer contemporary art, Munich 2017
Photo © Sophie-Charlotte Bombeck

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Oleksiy Koval 1,2,1,3,1,5
Karin Wimmer contemporary art, Munich 2017
Photo © Sophie-Charlotte Bombeck

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Oleksiy Koval 1,2,1,3,1,5
Karin Wimmer contemporary art, Munich 2017
Photo © Sophie-Charlotte Bombeck

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Oleksiy Koval 1,2,1,3,1,5
Karin Wimmer contemporary art, Munich 2017
Photo © Sophie-Charlotte Bombeck

OLEKSIY KOVAL | UTOPIA | ISTANBUL ART FAIR TÜYAP 2017

In EVENTS | VERANSTALTUNGEN on November 13, 2017 at 10:59 am

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Oleksiy Koval, RM 1, 2017
48“ Full HD screen, painted in Photoshop, JPEG
Photo © Rhythm Section

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Oleksiy Koval, RM 1, 2017
48“ Full HD screen, painted in Photoshop, JPEG
Photo © Rhythm Section

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Rhythm Section Utopia. Photo © Dmytro Goncharenko

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Photo © Dmytro Goncharenko

 

OLEKSIY KOVAL | 1, 2, 1, 3, 1, 5

In EVENTS | VERANSTALTUNGEN on October 9, 2017 at 8:11 am

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OLEKSIY KOVAL
1, 2, 1, 3, 1, 5

Ein herausragendes Element des Malprozesses ist der Rhythmus, in dem sich die Herstellung eines Werkes vollzieht. Rhythmische Strukturen generieren den Malprozess als eine mehr oder minder geregelte Bewegung in Raum und Zeit. Sie geben dem Anbringen von Farben auf Flächen eine Form.

An outstanding element of the process of painting is the rhythm in which the fabrication of an art work is accomplished. Rhythmical structures generate the process of painting as a more or less determinated movement in space and time. It gives form to the application of colors on surfaces.

Ausstellung:
27.10. – 24.11.2017

Eröffnung:
Donnerstag, 26.10.2017
19.00 Uhr

www.karinwimmer.com

Karin Wimmer contemporary art
Amalienstrasse 14
Munich 80333
Germany

STEVE COLEMAN ON OLEKSIY KOVAL’S PAINTING

In ESSAYS on June 26, 2017 at 1:20 pm
Oleksiy Koval, “11123”, 2012, 70 x 67 cm, marker on polyester. Photo © Klaus Mauz

Oleksiy Koval, “11123”, 2012, 70 x 67 cm, marker on polyester. Photo © Klaus Mauz


October 28, 2011 Oleksiy Koval invited me to participate in an exhibition involving music and painting. To be sure, music and painting projects have been presented many times throughout thousands of years. However, this particular collaboration was to focus on rhythm.

But what does this mean? It is clear what rhythm can be in musical terms, but not so clear in the discipline of painting. Through correspondences and meetings, I discussed these concepts with Oleksiy, and we found that we had many ideas in common.

I have always been drawn to creating music based on analogies with the natural world, and although Oleksiy’s ideas may not be this exactly, in my opinion some kind of analogies do exist in his work, or maybe I create them in my mind when viewing his paintings. However, this is not much different from the listener of music, where the sounds also stimulate the imaginations of individual audience members to create different visual fantasies in each person.

So, my own relationship to Oleksiy’s paintings are based on my own internal creations, stimulated by the shapes and colors in the paintings. And for me, there is rhythm in the placement, arrangement and relationship of these visual elements, just as rhythm in music is the same with sonic elements.

Music is a dynamic art, meaning it is always moving. The final result of a painting is not moving except in the mind of the viewer (or more precisely, it is not moving relative to the viewer). But there is also the rhythm in the act of painting, i.e., the rhythm of the gestures and technique that produce the painting, which is in motion. And, similar to music, through these gestures, ideas of meter, tempo, pulse relationships, etc., can be explored.

It’s in these areas that rhythm ideas can be explored through a kind of cross-discipline ensemble of musicians and painters. My most recent recording explores musical analogies of the biological rhythms of the human body. Several of Oleksiy’s paintings remind me of the themes that I have been exploring. Since we are ourselves a manifestation of Nature, any of our activities will in some way be connected to these natural rhythms. However, when a person is aware of their connection to Nature, then the rhythmic gestures of both the sonic and visual artists is in better alignment to the rhythms of Nature.

These are some of the thoughts and impressions that I feel, and that run through my mind while I am viewing Oleksiy’s paintings. From my point of view, these paintings can, similar to music, trigger an initial environment of mind and emotion, which can act as the substrate for the experience of an expanded awareness of the connection of all rhythmic activity.

Steve Coleman
Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, January 15, 2013


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Steve Coleman, Oleksiy Koval, Lothringer 13 Halle, Munich 2016. Photo © Jörg Koopmann

RHYTHM SECTION IM SCHAFHOF

In EVENTS | VERANSTALTUNGEN on February 9, 2017 at 8:07 am

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Eine gemeinsame Ausstellung von Künstlern aus Niederlande, Großbritannien, China, Türkei und Deutschland zum Thema Rhythmus in der Bildenden Kunst im europäischen Künstlerhaus Schafhof in Freising.

Thema der Ausstellung

Die Gruppe Rhythm Section besteht aus zeitgenössischen KünstlerInnen verschiedener Sparten, die sich explizit und bewusst in ihrem Werk mit Rhythmus beschäftigen. Der Austausch und die Dynamik, die aus solcher Zusammenstellung unterschiedlicher Einsätze und Medien entsteht, liefert neue Ansätze für die Kunst heute.

Es handelt sich dabei um das bisher größte Projekt dieser Art zwischen Niederlande, Großbritannien, China, Türkei und Deutschland, das sich mit dem Thema Rhythmus in der bildenden Kunst beschäftigt. Dieses Projekt soll einen intensiven kulturellen Austausch von Künstlern verschiedenster Nationalitäten anregen und helfen ein internationales Netzwerk zwischen diesen Ländern zu bilden.

RHYTHM SECTION IM SCHAFHOF
20. 2. ‒ 17. 4. 2017

Anneke Bosma NL
Karina Bugayova DE
Christoph Dahlhausen DE
Alison Dalwood GB
Mert Diner TR
Daniel Geiger DE
Henriëtte van ‘t Hoog NL
Gonghong Huang CN
Oleksiy Koval DE
Markus Krug DE
Çağrı Saray TR
Esra Sağlık TR
İsfendiyar Söyler TR
Nermin Ülker TR
Veronika Wenger DE
Michael Wright GB

www.rhythmsection.de

Schafhof – Europäisches Künstlerhaus Oberbayern
European House of Art Upper Bavaria
Am Schafhof 1, 85354 Freising
www.schafhof-kuenstlerhaus.de

19. Februar, Sonntag
SYMPOSIUM UND VERNISSAGE

15 Uhr: Symposium
Shuttlebus ab Bhf Freising: 14.30-14.50 Uhr
Vorträge von Mitgliedern und Gästen von Rhythm Section:

RHYTHM OF THE UTOPIAS
Vortrag von Ezgi Bakcay (Kunsthistorikerin, Istanbul)
in englischer Sprache

THE ROLE OF SCANNING AND KINESTHESTIC MODES OF PERCEPTION IN RELATION TO RHYTHM WITHIN THE VISUAL ARTS
Vortrag von Michael Wright (Künstler, London)
in englischer Sprache

HELP ALIVE INSIDE. IM INNERSTEN DER ZEICHNUNG
Vortrag von Veronika Wenger (Künstlerin, München)
in deutscher Sprache

FORSCHUNG ZUM RHYTHMUS IN DER MODERNEN KUNST: INTERNATIONALE KOLLABORATIVE ERFAHRUNG
Vortrag von Dmytro Goncharenko (Kurator, Kiew/Berlin)
in deutscher Sprache

8 Uhr: VERNISSAGE
Shuttlebus ab Bhf Freising: 17.30-17.50 Uhr; zurück; 19.45 Uhr

Grußwort: Eike Berg, Leiter des Europäischen Künstlerhauses
Einführung: Jochen Meister, Kunstvermittler, München

26. März, Sonntag 15 Uhr
DIE SCHÖNE FORMEL
Vortrag von Oleksiy Koval (Künstler, München)
in deutscher Sprache

RHYTHM & METHOD | GALERIE DER KÜNSTLER | MUNICH 2015

In EVENTS | VERANSTALTUNGEN on July 22, 2015 at 9:33 am
Oleksiy Koval, Rhythm & Methode, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

Oleksiy Koval, Rhythm & Method, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

Oleksiy Koval, Rhythm & Methode, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

Oleksiy Koval, Rhythm & Method, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

Oleksiy Koval, Rhythm & Method, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

Oleksiy Koval, Rhythm & Method, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

Oleksiy Koval, Rhythm & Method, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

Oleksiy Koval, Rhythm & Method, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

Oleksiy Koval (with Henriëtte van't Hoog), Rhythm & Method, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

Oleksiy Koval (with Henriëtte van’t Hoog), Rhythm & Method, Galerie der Künstler, Munich. Photo © Klaus Mauz.

RHYTHM IN MY PAINTING

In ESSAYS on June 3, 2011 at 10:49 am

Img. 1, “Oranta”, 2003, acrylic on MDF, 132 x 132 cm, collection Katholische Akademie, Munich. Photo © Peng Li

Since I often have been asked about rhythm in my painting, I decided to write down my thoughts on the subject. First I want to emphasize that rhythm is only one of several properties of painting, with which I deal while applying the colour. A successful painting surely includes other components.

Img. 2, “Eliakim”, 2004, acrylic on MDF, 73 x 70 cm, collection Guangdong Museum of Art, China. Photo © Antje Hanebeck

What is rhythm? Biological rhythm is caused by periodic states and changes of organisms; in poetry rhythm is considered as sequences of different accent patterns within the constancy of the verse metre; in language rhythm is defined as the temporal division of speech; the rhythm in music is the accent patterns designated through the sequence of different note values that overlay the basic pulse. But what is rhythm in painting?

Img. 3, “Lamed”, 2002, acrylic on MDF, 132 x 132 cm, private collection Munich. Photo © Bernard Larsson

During my studies at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich I was looking for a polarity in painting: I wanted to avoid spacial representations and instead produce a difference, in which the colour remains on the surface and yet wins visual vastness. For not loosing control in my experiments with the properties of colour, I was looking for a way of organizing the surface that should provide me with an obvious entry and a clear conclusion in painting. So I have developed a basic model, which divides the surface into equal intervals of numerical impulses such as 1/4 (Img. 1), 1/9, 1/16 (Img. 2), 1/25 or 1/36 (Img. 3). Such metre encourages not only the concentration of spontaneous choices between events, but also causes a conscious attitude towards the pace, in which colours can be attached on surfaces.

Img. 4, “Untitled”, 2009, watercolour on paper, 50 x 55,5 cm, private collection Starnberg. Photo © Klaus Mauz

According to the division of the surface I focused my thoughts on the procedure of the movement in painting. The moment in which the colour touches the surface I take as a unit that is formed by rhythmic accentuations e.g. 2,3,1 or 1,1,2 or 1,6 etc. and then gives shape applying the colour.

To clarity the use of metre and rhythm in my work, I suggest three examples. In the watercolour-painting “Untitled” (Img. 4) of 2009 I used 3 primary colours: magenta (M), cyan (C), yellow (Y) and white (W). Here I selected magenta (M) as a dominant colour and I combined it successively with W, C, Y and then together with WCY. To avoid the monotony during the addition of colour, I decided to use the rhythmic motif 2,1,1,1 and the metre 1/4. This resulted in 4 colour sequences that began with MW, MC, MY, MYCW:

MW-MW-MY-MYCW-MC

MC-MC-MCY-MY-MYCW

MY-MY-MYC-MC-MYCW

MYCW- MYCW-MYW-MCW

Img. 5, “Schwarze Milch”, 2010, 185 x 200, oil on MDF, photo (c) Klaus Mauz

For the painting “Schwarze Milch” (Img. 5) I used the metre  1/9 and the rhythmic motif 1,2,3,2.

Img. 6, “Partytura”, 2010, 60 x 50 cm, chalk on polyester, photo (c) Klaus Mauz

In “Partytura” (Img. 6), I tried to use a polyrhythmic motif with two levels of metre: the metre 1/9 with the rhythm 1,6 and the metre 1/4 with the rhythm 2,3,1.

Since painting means the application of colours on a surface using a tool, it results in motions side by side in space and motion that occuer one after another in time, which make a specific physiognomy. This motion divides itself into repetitive accents – and that is their rhythm.

Thanks for help realizing this text to Prof. Bernhard Lypp, Stefan Schessl and Marion Sally Amy Whyte

THE CHARACTER OF PAINTINGS

In ESSAYS on February 6, 2011 at 8:26 pm

Titian, “Crown of Thorn”, 1572 – 76, Alte Pinakothek, Munich

“…when one has character, one has talent. I’m not saying that character is enough, that it is enough to be a good man, in order to be able to paint well. That would be too easy. But I don’t believe that a reprobate can have artistic genius.” Paul Cezanne

My friend, the painter Gonghong Huang uses the term ‘character’ when he judges painting: “Look, what a good character this painting has!” or “This picture has no character!” I think I understand what Gonghong wants to say. Now I want to define the character for myself and ask what the character of paintings could be.

The word character in Greek means “feature”. In psychological terms ‘character’ means the properties of an individual, on stage it is the role one plays; ‘character’ means the combination of both congential and acquired intellectual and emotional features of a person. But what is the character of paintings or what may be the properties of a painting?

To answer this question, I have chosen three paintings: Titian’s “Crown of Thorn” from 1572 – 76, which can be seen in Munich’s Alte Pinakothek; Cezanne’s “Still Life with Skull and Candlestick” 1900 – 04 from the State Gallery Stuttgart und Mondrian’s “Composition Nr. I, with Red and Black” 1929, from the Kunstmuseum Basel.

When reading Stefan Schessl’s approval work for the state examination at the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, I became aware of a phrase of art theorist Nikolai Tarabukin (1889-1956): “In painting, and in art in general, the problem of materials must be considered separately, in that the painter must acquire a developed sense of materials, he must feel the inherent characteristics of each material which of themselves condition the construction of the object. The material dictates the forms, and not the opposite.” Titian paints “Crown of Thorns” 1572 – 76 on thick canvas of a somewhat coarser structure. The painter leaves the dense and heavy character of the tissue clearly visible. Titian paints “alla prima”, he puts down the oil paint with light brush strokes, so that the colour remains on the surface and the structure of the canvas is shining through. The Venetian paints quickly, he is not waiting for the oil paint to dry completely. He uses the same brush on many different points of the canvas, applicates a colour on one point, takes up from this point two further colours and moves on to the next point. The painter lets the form grow out of the character of the oil paint. Cezanne creates “skull and candlesticks” the same way. “Im Horizont der Zeit. Heideggers Werkbegriff und die Kunst der Moderne” Gottfried Boehm writes about Paul Cezanne: “Attempting to approach this temporal structure that is dominating the painting, again we come across the presence of a colored matter, which is woven through all we see.” Cezanne masters the properties of oil paint. The colored matter is made out of strong and transparent and dense parts, out of parts that are applied wet on wet and wet on dry. For Piet Mondrian, however, the properties of oil paint are not essential. In “Composition Nr. I, with Red and Black” from 1929 Mondrian uses the oil paint as a means to clarify the character of the surface. He covers the surfaces layer by layer, until the entire surface results in a unitied consistancy.

Piet Mondrian, “Composition Nr. I, with Red and Black”, 1929, Kunstmuseum Basel

Piet Mondrian limited himself to the three primary colours, as well as black, gray and white. Only when I examine Mondrian’s works closely, I became aware that the artist has sought his primary colours while painting and found them by changing and repainting. In “Composition Nr. I, with red and black” the painter combined and distributed red, black and white so as to keep warm-cold and light-dark contrasts in exciting balance. Although Titian never covers up but preserves the brush strokes on the surface, his colours and shades cause the paintings depth and width. The deeper character of colour of intermingled veiled red, yellow, blue and white indicates to the viewer the visual motif of the painting. The balanced colouring of primary colours and white in “The Crown of Thorns” is guiding the eye continuously through the paintings lighter and darker areas. “Cezanne used blue to stress out his yellow, but like anything else he used it with his uncompared capacities of distinction.” – this way Matisse talked about Cezanne in 1908. In “Still Life with Skull and Candlestick” 1900-04 Paul Cezanne uses a complementary contrast. Orange-ocre und blue-gray are counterweights the painter lets collide with rapid brush strokes onto each other to complete the painting. In his book “The Art of Cezannes: Colour, Rhythm, Symbolism” Munich-based art historian Lorenz Dittmann describes Cezanne’s still life. The painting “lives from the contrast of cool blue-gray and yellow ocre. It is “unfinished” – in the sense that the canvas is not completely covered with colour, but the coloured zone within the gray-toned canvas consists a rhythmically full form…”

Paul Cezanne, “Still Life with Skull and Candlestick”, 1900 – 04, State Gallery Stuttgart

“We consider rhythm as a repetition of equally spaced accents. For its existence it requires a metre, a measurable unit of distance that allows the regularity of the flow (rhythm). … Such metre can be found in paintings, it is symmetry in the true sense of the word, the commitment to a basic measure. … But now this basic measure can be perceived through the marking accents in appearance, no matter how tender they might be. The emphasis is not without character, not mere emphasis, but rather steadily, irregular, skipping, burdensome, heavy, light, bright, serious and the like. There is nothing like a painting without metre and without rhythm, because only with these two unseparatable components of composition those parts of the work of art constituted, which give to a work of art its required entity.”, writes the art historian Kurt Badt. The late works of Titian and the “Crown of Thorns” are especially marked by the rhythm within the placement of colour. The uniform spacing and regular accents of colour brought onto the canvas with the brush all over the entire surface in different speeds constitute a complete form in terms of rhythm. “All his works are rhythmisized and metric, but in some of his watercolours the basic lines of the metrication still remain visible”, as Lorenz Dittmann writes about Cezanne. Horizontal and vertical outlines and basic lines of the still life bring forth the framework of a rhythmically organized application of colour. The basic lines separate and combine the distances and accents, which stem from repetition and regularity. “True Boogie-Woogie I conceive as homogeneous in intention with mine in painting: destruction of melody which is the equivalent of destruction of natural appearance; and construction through the continuous opposition of pure means – dynamic rhythm.”, Piet Mondrian says. And in the Text “Mondrian and the Music” Karin v. Maur writes: “Of all rhythms, the rhythm of the vertical-horizontal position is the most fundamental. It is therefore that a perfect balance penetrates everything. … In the magnetic field between the “metre” of the given plane with its division into horizontals and verticals and the rhythmically displaced points of gravity of the colour spots and the axial displacements, the pictorial action takes place.” In “Composition No. I, with red and black” Piet Mondrian rhythmisizes the space-time by variable relations of straight lines and pure colours. As with Cezanne and Titian rhythm dominates Mondrian’s Painting; in the process of perception rhythm attacks and overwhelms the visible. “The purest rhythm must be the purest expression of life … all expressions of rhythm are true.”, says Piet Mondrian.

Thanks for help realizing this text to Prof. Bernhard Lypp, Stefan Schessl and Marion Sally Amy Whyte

RHYTHM SECTION IM FRUCHTHOF, München 16.12. – 19.12.2010

In EVENTS | VERANSTALTUNGEN on January 4, 2011 at 1:36 pm

Oleksiy Koval, “Peperoni”, 2010, 140 x 160 cm, oil on polyester, photo (c) Klaus Mauz

Oleksiy Koval, “Partytura”, 2010, 60 x 50 cm, chalk on polyester, photo (c) Klaus Mauz

photo (c) Klaus Mauz

Oleksiy Koval, “1 to 6”, 2010, 60 x 70 cm, oil on MDF, photo (c) Klaus Mauz

Oleksiy Koval, “Camouflage”, 2010, 80 x 70 cm, oil on polyester, photo (c) Klaus Mauz

photo (c) Klaus Mauz

Oleksiy Koval, “Gelb”, 2010, 70 x 80 cm, oil on polyester, photo (c) Klaus Mauz

Oleksiy Koval, “Grüne Kricksel”, 2010, 145 x 115 cm, oil on polyester, photo (c) Klaus Mauz

Oleksiy Koval, “Schwarze Milch”, 2010, 185 x 200, oil on MDF, photo (c) Klaus Mauz

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